Fumotoppara: One of Japan’s Most Popular Campgrounds

Bask in Fujisan’s Shadow

On my latest getaway to try and sneak in one final hike before returning to my teaching post I spent a night at Fumotoppara campground just a hop, skip and a jump away from Mt. Ryugadake. Fumotoppara is located in Shizuoka Prefecture, resting in the lowlands of Mt. Fuji which rises dramatically to the east with Mt. Kenashi to the rear. The colossal campground which I’m waging is Japan’s largest (equivalent to 100 Tokyo Dome’s) can accommodate a jaw-dropping 1,500 tents! If you need any further convincing of its popularity, check out these pics of Fumotoppara during peak season.

It’s open year-round, pets OK, and you can set up your tent anywhere you like within the designated area. Thankfully when I visited it was relatively quiet being both mid-week and still quite cold – it sits at 830 metres. Having said that when I left the campground before 6:00 am to go hiking, no kidding but there were already two cars idling at the gate. They were in for a long wait as admin doesn’t get going until 8:30 am! For solo hikers at least the price is a very reasonable 1,000 yen. It’s accessible by bus from Kawaguchiko or Shin-Fuji stations. From the bus stop it’s an easy 20-minute walk. Just down the road from the bus stop is a FamilyMart if you need to stock up on supplies.

PROS
+ Same day online reservations
+ Set up your tent anywhere you like
+ Possible to access via public transportation
+ Well priced for solo travellers
+ Late checkout (14:00)
+ Helpful and friendly staff
+ Amenities are kept very clean including heated seats and washlets!
+ If it’s uncomfortably cold you can avail yourself of the cafeteria at night time
+ Vending machines include both food and drinks
+ Nearby convenience store
+ Pet friendly
+ And of course, a killer view of Fujisan

CONS
– Can be cold in the shoulder seasons
– Exposed to the elements and subject to strong winds
– Very crowded on weekends and holidays
– Staking tents can be difficult due to stones mixed in with soil
– Communal bath only available during busy periods
– No paid showers
– Temporary toilets during peak seasons
– Nearest hot spring is Asagiri Onsen Kaze no Yu about 9 km away

.

  Access: From Kawaguchiko Station take a bus bound for Shin-Fuji Station operated by Fujikyu Shizuoka Bus (59 mins, 1,490 yen). Closest bus stop Asagiri Green Park a 20 minute walk.

  View from the Asagiri Green Park bus stop.

.

  Basking under Fujisan.

.

  Hiding in the shadows.

.

  Around dusk at Fumotoppara Campground.

.

  Fujisan after sundown.

  Mirror image.

4 comments
  • Cool. I haven’t spent much time on that side of Fuji.

    I’m going back to school tomorrow, too. This will be the first time in a few years that I have had to work Monday through Friday. I am heartbroken about losing all my hiking time.

    • I hear you! Me too back to school tomorrow Mon to Fri. Yes, time consuming getting over that side from Tokyo and will be back again in the autumn. Had to concede defeat climbing Kenashiyama owing the surprising amount of snow.

      • I recommend readers of this site contemplating any winter hike read this.
        ” The perils of winter mountain climbing are so great that the big Facebook group, Hiking In Japan (where there are a lot of experienced hikers with extensive knowledge of the mountains in Japan, including safety tips and routes around the country), that the owner Wes Lang and I moderate, expressly do not give out route knowledge for winter mountains due to worries about beginners attempting something that could put them into grave danger. We’ve already had two very technically savvy mountaineers die on solo walks in high, snow mountains, so we take the dangers very seriously”

  • Love Fumotto! The hike up Mt. Kenashi behind it is a real slog to the top, but has some real killer views. Did that last fall during my last stay, but my legs were killing me that evening.

Archives